Antiquing (and drinking) in the Lakes Region.

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I didn’t see much of the lakes when we visited the lakes region the other day.

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But I did see every single antique store in the town of Bridgeton. Some even had their very own Name That Crap pieces.

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Seriously, this thing had a question mark on the price tag. Anyone want to hazard a guess? I can’t answer because I have no clue.. so no judgement if you get it wrong.

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It was approaching 1:00pm when we hit this store and my stomach was grumbling it’s protest of a lunchless noon. I believe the store was also sending me subtle hints it was time for a cocktail.

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Because if a bottle hugging lobster isn’t clear enough… there’s martini Jesus. And who am I to argue with the Lord?

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I’d been hearing about this place for years but never tried it. The atmosphere was fun, very horsey.

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The rosemary pear Cosmo? Meh. Nothing to write home about. My Rachel sandwich was much the same, and while the husband’s French onion soup was tasty.. his fish and chips was a solid chunk of heavy batter encircling the skinniest, most anorexic haddock ever to float the sea. Seriously, the saddles hanging on the wall would have been more appetizing.

Stomachs full but not overly satisfied, we kept shopping.

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At Grandma’s Front Porch we found another Name That Crap mystery item. Seems to me if you’re going to price and sell something… you should know what the heck it is first.

🤣

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34 thoughts on “Antiquing (and drinking) in the Lakes Region.”

  1. Yo, Riv, what up?
    Been junkin’, I see. Maybe I can help.
    The first one is a real piece of…The industrial and agricultural history of Maine. It’s the prototype of a machine called la poussierie, invented in 1894 by Jean-Pomme du Terre (Probably assumed), a pioneer in the development of instant mashed potatoes.
    To operate the machine, you set it up in the middle of a tarp with a washtub full of boiled potatoes. There are a few missing parts, most notably the drive belt and pulleys. With those in place, load the upper enclosure witth potatoes and energize the motor by putting a big wharf rat in the lower, hamster wheel part. The lower pulley is significantly larger than the upper, causing it to spin more rapidly. The potatoes then pulverize one another and stick to the spokes where they are thrown out onto the tarp to dry in the Sun. If it rains, no sweat. Instead of JP’s instant mashed potatoes, we’re having Jeannie’s Aroostook style extra bland potato soup. It makes any sandwich taste better. The machine never went into production, probably due to the machinations of the Idaho cartel.
    I have no idea about the second one. If you want one, though, I’ll bet your loving husband could make you one out of that lumber stashed away under the barn. It’s not the best anniversary gift, but it’s definitely better than a sharp stick in the eye. I hope this helps.

    Liked by 2 people

  2. My mother had both of those items, but I cannot remember seeing them in action. I was only like 4 years old! Curse me for not remembering. They did not move to the new house in town with us as far as I can remember.

    Liked by 1 person

      1. This memory is not reliable, but I see the second item in the barn near the cow’s stall. Looking at what remains of this contraption I can almost imagine her hooking up tubes to a cow’s udder and sitting there using a foot pedal to somehow milk the cow. But, I was always already in bed when the cow was put in the barn. No four year-old boy would ever jump out of a warm bed to sneak into the barn to watch his mother milk a cow, now would I? I mean “he”?

        Liked by 1 person

  3. Two things I notice from this post, (1) Damn that water looks cold, (2) You live in a hoarders paradise. Besides, everyone knows that the Nativity glass would be full of Red Wine, Merlot for sure, because Mary just seems like the Merlot type.

    Liked by 1 person

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