Do you pea?

.

To pea or not to pea. That is today’s question.

Personally, I do not pea… but the husband is a huge fan so when hams are on sale for Christmas and I’m left with a bone, there’s only one thing he wants.

.

.

Split pea soup. Which happens to be the easiest soup to make… so it’s hard to refuse even though I can’t stand the smell or taste.

.

.

5 hours later ? A pot full of slop with the consistency of sludge as far as I’m concerned.

.

.

But the husband is in leftover pea heaven, and hey… I have to throw him a bone now and then.

😉

.

50 thoughts on “Do you pea?”

      1. Like what? Don’t answer that if you don’t want to. I know I get a little mad sometimes, but not this time. I’m really interested. It may surprise you, but I have a pretty dim view of a lot of Americans myself.

        Like

      2. Just that some people sacrifice value for appearance. I’ve seen numerous documentaries over the years, though I cannot name them, about throwing out good food that does not have a pleasing appearance. It occurs in both our countries and probably in some other so-called civilized countries. While people all over the world starve we are putting good food in the garbage because it is not perfect. A lot of those documentaries come from various places in the States.
        But I was talking about Wonder Bread, which tastes like paste and turns into globs of wet flour in the mouth. How anyone can eat it I do not understand. Yet, as far as we are told, it is one of the most popular bread brands in America. Is it because it is shiny wnite? I have no idea, But I cannot understand why it is so popular. It’s not even food.

        Like

  1. So you don’t like kale or peas!? Wtf River? I get the cilantro because, totes yuck, but peas? Wow, I’m in shock….I love peas, and kale and fruitcake. Hey, I actually made the wild rice, mushroom soup you posted a while back. But I made it with chicken not turkey because I rarely have leftover turkey. You know having three grown sons and them all eating like bears ready to hibernate. It was super good! Oh o also made those Christmas margaritas in one of my new blenders I got for Christmas. Let me tell you, they were so freaking good so now you need to make them, so take your mind of having to make tons of pea slop…..🤣😝.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. It’s so simple.

      4 quarts water
      2 bags split peas… green or yellow
      I large yellow onion, chopped
      at least 4 cups leftover ham, chopped
      ham bone
      salt and pepper to taste

      Boil water in large pot
      Rinse dry peas in colander
      Take boiling water off heat, add peas and let soak for an hour
      Add ham, onion and bone, stir
      Bring to boil, stir.
      Reduce to simmer/slight boil
      Stir, stir, stir for hours on end until it starts to thicken … then stir even more so it doesn’t scorch on the bottom. It’s all about the stirring.
      Lower heat when it reaches desired consistency. Add salt and pepper.

      I can’t vouch for this recipe because I can’t stand the stuff… but the husband loves it.
      😉

      Liked by 1 person

      1. That’s nasty and definitely something no one should eat before a long drive on a cold day. The south comes out on top with the lowcountry boil. Shrimp, crab, potatoes and corn on the cob. You probably already know that, having lived in God’s other country.

        Liked by 1 person

  2. Split Pea Soup is OK ~ but I make it with carrots, celery, potatoes, thyme, rosemary, garlic, onion, vegetable bouillon, oregano, and sometimes cabbage or spinach. No ham. When it’s done, I puree it to get rid of lumps and serve it with toasted croutons.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. This is kind of an egotistical thing to say but I like split pea soup when I make it. Everyone else’s is choking on my dust. My evil secret: Ham goes in first and glazes the bottom of the pot. Deglaze with chicken stock and add half a stick of butter. I soak the peas overnight in cold water, bearing in mind that night comes late and morning comes early. Cathy likes the flavor of onion but can’t abide a piece of it in her mouth, so onions get vaporized in the food processor. These go in with the ham, broth and butter. Stir it around until you can smell it all over the house, about five seconds. put in the peas and water, roughly twice the depth of the peas, boil it like Hell for about ten minutes, then turn it off and leave it on the burner until it’s cool enough to touch then warm it over until you get the consistency you like. I’ve had it with some shredded pancetta on top and it’s really good. It brings up the taste of the ham and separates it from the taste of the peas. Homogenous has never been my thing. There’s my green slop recipe, enjoy not eating it. I have it with cornbread.

    Liked by 1 person

      1. Wow, I just had a wicky wacky little memory pop up inside my skull: When I was a kid, we ate a lot of beans. A LOT of beans, almost always dry. I remember sitting at the table with my mom, going through the beans and picking out the pebbles, sticks and little clods of dirt. I haven’t culled out a bag of beans lately, so I don’t know if that’s still a problem. Some of those bags had so much crap in them we should have gotten a partial refund. I swear you’d think they grew under the ground. Next time I make a pot of beans I’ll still cull them out anyway. I don’t trust anyone enough to risk chomping on a pebble.

        Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s