Revolutionary Museum finale…. a farm, some fowl, and a few gag worthy recipes.

 

The end of our living history tour was a typical Yorktown, Virginia farm of 18th century.

 

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It re-creates the life of Edward Moss,  and you can read a little about it  here.

 

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The house was simple, but comfortable enough for the time…

 

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Or so Edward told us.

 

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There was a separate building for cooking… where they were currently following old recipes and baking pies.

 

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Apparently you used to be able to sample the food, but the health department put the kibosh on that and now you can only drool.

 

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And although the pie smelled great, I can’t say I’d be too eager to try any of these recipes.

 

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Calf’s head surprise…?

 

 

No.

 

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Transmogrified pigeon?

Yeah…  I’ll pass on that as well.

I did get a kick out of this spice jar stopper though.

 

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As promised….

 

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Some chickens.

 

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Because no matter where I go, I tend to find fowl.

 

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There was candle making.

 

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And slave quarters.

 

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Complete with….

 

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You guessed it.

Shoes.

 

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There was a tobacco drying shed, because back then tobacco equaled money.

 

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And if you’ve never had occasion to be in one?

 

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Trust me… it smells wonderful.

 

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A few more buildings…

 

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A lot more fencing…. and we were done.

 

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Well…

 

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After I said goodbye to the resident ducks.

 

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I do love me some waterfowl.

 

 

19 thoughts on “Revolutionary Museum finale…. a farm, some fowl, and a few gag worthy recipes.”

      1. Tobacco used to be a major cash crop in Wisconsin, but today very few farms remain. Those that do are primarily located in southeast Dane County. One of the rare tobacco farmers keeping this Wisconsin agricultural tradition alive is Curt Watson, a fourth generation tobacco farmer.

        He farms eight acres near Edgerton, which is down from 14 acres just a few years ago. The government used to subsidize the industry, but it was deregulated around 15 years ago. And a federal tobacco buyout program to help ease farmers into an unregulated market made its last payments nearly five years ago.
        https://www.wisconsinlife.org/story/rare-wisconsin-tobacco-farmers-hang-on-to-tradition/

        Liked by 1 person

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