Tag Archives: language

Random River drivel.

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Lord Dudley Mountcatten sleeps in some odd positions.

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I look, and think he must be uncomfortable… but the wee beast sleeps like that 19 hours a day so I must be mistaken.

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Have you ever tried a recipe and had your hopes for decadent dessert deliciousness dashed?

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That’s what happened when I found a recipe for caramel banana upside down cake. I painstakingly followed the directions… and while it looked and smelled wonderful?

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It was a banana topped brick. I swear I could have used it as a doorstop… or to bash in someone’s head. The husband and I took one bite a piece and heaved it in the trash.

Tres disappointing.

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But I passed this woodpile later in the day…

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And had to smile.

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Be sure to ask for an extra stabby grabby the next time you go out to eat…. and think of me.

😉

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Talk like a Mainer… part two.

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So you can understand what the natives are saying when you visit.

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When I first moved here I thought this was a ridiculous adjective. 43 years later? I still do.

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Never let a dubbah be responsible for the beer. No good can come from that.

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If you live in the back of beyond? Behind the puckerbrush, in bumblefuck Egypt? You live in the willywacks… and really can’t get there from heah.

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Maine speak… part one.

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If you’ve ever visited my state and had a conversation with the locals, you might have been baffled by some of our regional expressions. You had no idea what the hell we were talking about? No worries… I’m here to help.

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We say this a lot. (But please ignore the ‘how’. It should be now.)

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Hint – “The County” is usually uttered with derision in southern Maine. Aroostook is potato country, way up by the Canadian border…. we have to pump sunlight to those people.

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This a is a very popular word in my neck of the woods. It affirms a position as well as cutting off the need for further discussion. Mainers can be a taciturn bunch.

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Personally, I don’t use this term. The word tourist and it’s synonyms… snowbirds, outta staters, Massholes ( specific to people from the Boston area ) are much more common. But these people do swarm our best areas from June to September and are extremely easy to spot.

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Like this couple we saw the other day.

Mainers. Do. Not. Wear. Bibs. When. Eating. Lobster.

Ever.

🤣

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Language is a beautiful thing.

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I speak a little French, a touch of German and even less Latin… though technically I guess no one speaks Latin, we just trot it out at cocktail parties to impress people… which ironically, often has the opposite effect.

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When I was young my mother taught me a few helpful phrases in Hungarian… so if you’re ever in Budapest and need to say, Come here and kiss me? I’m your girl.

Language is a fascinating thing, but I’ve always felt sorry for people who need to learn ours…. because let’s face it, English is all over the place.

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I never thought about any of these…

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But they’re so true!

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Yup.

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English.

It’s clear as mud.

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Pandemic language.

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Husband was flipping through a magazine the other day and came across this…

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I think we all know our fair share of those.

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While I adore my phone, I have a strict no tech in bed policy. That way there be monsters….

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Karen. What a bitch.

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I admit to not being familiar with that term.

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But yes, it seems every day is Blursday lately.

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Needless to say I am very familiar with that term.

🍸

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Most excellent!

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It looks like Mayor Pete might be my husband’s new boss.

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While we liked Pete during the primaries, it’s for another reason entirely that I’ll be squealing with glee if his nomination is approved.

Yes, ladies and gentlemen… (and everyone in between) his name?

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His name directly translates as father of chickens.

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And that must be celebrated.

Casual Friday at the Federal Aviation Administration could look like this in the near future:

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And that’s a beautiful thing.

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Say what?

 

I forgot I still had some of these crazy foreign words in my files.

So keep reading… they might come in handy some day.

 

Zhaghzhagh (Persian)

The chattering of teeth from the cold or from rage.

 

I don’t have much of a temper, but the next time this happens…..

At least I’ll know what to call it.

 

Cavoli Riscaldati (Italian)

The result of attempting to revive an unworkable relationship. Translates to “reheated cabbage.”

 

Oh, those Italians.

Ever the romantics….

 

Ultimate Korra Caption Contest Winner - on Komic Korra

 

Kaelling (Danish)

You know that woman who stands on her doorstep (or in line at the supermarket, or at the park, or in a restaurant) cursing at her children? The Danes know her, too.

I think we all know that woman.

 

13gthz

 

Bakku-shan (Japanese)

Japanese slang term which describes the experience of seeing a woman who appears pretty from behind but not from the front.

Because sometimes, you just can’t tell.

 

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I bet we all remember this last one from Laverne and Shirley…. but I never new what it meant until now.

Schlemiel and schlimazel (Yiddish)

Someone prone to bad luck. Yiddish distinguishes between the schlemiel and schlimazel, whose fates would probably be grouped under those of the klutz in other languages. The schlemiel is the traditional maladroit, who spills his coffee; the schlimazel is the one on whom it’s spilled.

 

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Did you know….

 

There’s a school in Reykjavik, Iceland that teaches you how to spot elves?

I did, because….

 

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Yes, you can enroll  here  and start learning all there is to know about trolls, fairies, gnomes and other assorted mythical creatures.

 
Admit it.
You want to go.

Did you know...

The tongues of flamingos were a common delicacy at ancient Rome feasts?

 

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Apparently Nero thought so as well.

 

Did you know.

The word misteltoe derives from the Anglo-Saxon words mistel and tan?

Mistel means dung…. and tan means twig. So the next time you steal a kiss at Christmas? You’ll be doing it under a dung twig.

Can’t get much more romantic than that.

 

 

292238-What-Happens-Under-The-Mistletoe-Stays-Under-The-Mistletoe

 

 

Did you know….

The band Steely Dan got it’s name from a William Bourroughs book called Naked Lunch.

Steely Dan III was a strap on dildo.

 

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Which gives an entirely new meaning to this meme.

 

(Yes, all the above statements are true.

Knowledge is a wonderful thing!)

 

 

 

 

Wording.

 

I love to word.

I love to read them, write them, and learn them.

And I love weirdo words most of all.

When you travel you hear words unique to certain regions and words used in different contexts.

Words!

Ya gotta love them.

 

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So when I saw this the other day?

I knew I had to share.

 

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I admit I’ve been known to make use of dingleberry, dicombobulated and kerfuffle now and then…. although I’m not nearly old enough to drop whippersnapper into a conversation any time soon.

In Maine we tend to say things are wicked. As in “That margarita is wicked good”  or “That beer is wicked cold”.

We also can lose control of our cars and end up in the  puckerbrush.

Mainers say  ayuh  when we mean yes.

We call submarine sandwiches Italians.

If you’re cute? We’ll call you  cunnin’.

If something is the best? We’ll say it’s  finest kind.

If you live far away from town? That would be the willy wacks.

And if you live really far away from town? That’s  bumblefuckEgypt.

 

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So educate me.

What words do you use in your backyard?

 

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Part 2… of something I started a while ago then promptly forgot about.

 

Language.

By definition, the method of human communication.

Glorious varieties abound, so let’s take a look at some foreign words you may not be familiar with… and their meanings.

 

Shemomedjamo (Georgian)

You know when you’re really full, but your meal is just so delicious, you can’t stop eating it? The Georgians feel your pain. This word means, “I accidentally ate the whole thing.”

I don’t know about you..

But I have totally shemomedjamo’d in my day.

 

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Backpfeifengesicht (German)

A face badly in need of a fist.

Oh, I think we’ve all met a few of those.

 

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Faamiti (Samoan)

To make a squeaking sound by sucking air past the lips in order to gain the attention of a dog or child.

I’d just call it a whistle, but who am I to argue with a Samoan?

 

 

(Okay… so I was looking for a GIF of a big bad Samoan warrior when this popped up. Big bad Samoan bat will kick your *ss!)

 

Gigil (Filipino)

The urge to pinch or squeeze something that is irresistibly cute.

I have this every time I watch the movie Magic Mike…

But maybe that’s just me.

 

Magic_Mike_foto_film

 

Lagom (Swedish)

Maybe Goldilocks was Swedish? This slippery little word is hard to define, but means something like, “Not too much, and not too little, but juuuuust right.”

*See above comment and picture of Magic Mike cast*

 

Zeg (Georgian)

It means “the day after tomorrow.” OK, we do have “overmorrow” in English, but when was the last time someone used that?

Never.

No one has ever used overmorrow in my presence…. and I want you all to start right now.

 

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(Proof positive there is a meme for everything)